• All Alone

    All Alone

    Mine shaft phone from Cerro Gordo Mines. In 1867, tales of the strike at Cerro Gordo had spread to other mining camps and a full blown silver boom had blasted its way onto the new land of opportunity. Back then, it took at least two weeks to get to where the action was, from any place like San Francisco, Carson City or Virginia City. Los Angeles, where there were only about 2,800 people, was only a struggling little cow-town commonly known throughout the state as "El Pueblo." Cerro Gordo was just beginning to boom!This image is a medium format film original offered as a limited edition (50 impressions in all sizes) print on canvas, photo paper or watercolor paper.

  • Miners Way

    Miners Way

    Mine Shaft supplies from Cerro Gordo Mines. In 1867, tales of the strike at Cerro Gordo had spread to other mining camps and a full blown silver boom had blasted its way onto the new land of opportunity. Back then, it took at least two weeks to get to where the action was, from any place like San Francisco, Carson City or Virginia City. Los Angeles, where there were only about 2,800 people, was only a struggling little cow-town commonly known throughout the state as "El Pueblo." Cerro Gordo was just beginning to boom!This image is a medium format film original offered as a limited edition (50 impressions in all sizes) print on canvas, photo paper or watercolor paper.

  • Til Morning

    Til Morning

    Lanterns to light the way in Cerro Gordo Mines. In 1867, tales of the strike at Cerro Gordo had spread to other mining camps and a full blown silver boom had blasted its way onto the new land of opportunity. Back then, it took at least two weeks to get to where the action was, from any place like San Francisco, Carson City or Virginia City. Los Angeles, where there were only about 2,800 people, was only a struggling little cow-town commonly known throughout the state as "El Pueblo." Cerro Gordo was just beginning to boom!This image is a medium format film original offered as a limited edition (50 impressions in all sizes) print on canvas, photo paper or watercolor paper.

  • The Pass I

    The Pass I

    A Series of four images, a 1937 flat head Ford Truck outside of Death Valley, California. The images depict the results of nature and the elements over many years.This image is a medium format film original offered as a limited edition (50 impressions in all sizes) print on canvas.

  • The Pass II

    The Pass II

    A Series of four images, a 1937 flat head Ford Truck outside of Death Valley, California. The images depict the results of nature and the elements over many years.This image is a medium format film original offered as a limited edition (50 impressions in all sizes) print on canvas.

  • The Pass III

    The Pass III

    A Series of four images, a 1937 flat head Ford Truck outside of Death Valley, California. The images depict the results of nature and the elements over many years.This image is a medium format film original offered as a limited edition (50 impressions in all sizes) print on canvas.

  • The Pass IV

    The Pass IV

    A Series of four images, a 1937 flat head Ford Truck outside of Death Valley, California. The images depict the results of nature and the elements over many years.This image is a medium format film original offered as a limited edition (50 impressions in all sizes) print on canvas.

  • Wings

    Wings

    In the back country of Death Valley, rests the wings.This image is a medium format film original offered as a limited edition (50 impressions in all sizes) print on photo paper and watercolor paper.

  • Wheel in the Sky

    Wheel in the Sky

    Bodie, CaliforniaIn 1859 William (a.k.a. Waterman) S. Bodey discovered gold near what is now called Bodie Bluff. A mill was established in 1861 and the town began to grow. It started with about 20 miners and grew to an estimated 10,000 people by 1880! By then, the town of Bodie bustled with families, robbers, miners, store owners, gunfighters, prostitutes and people from every country in the world. At one time there was reported to be 65 saloons in town. Among the saloons were numerous brothels and 'houses of ill repute', gambling halls and opium dens - an entertainment outlet for everyone.This image is a medium format film original offered as a limited edition (50 impressions in all sizes) print on photo paper or watercolor paper.

  • Bessie's Smile

    Bessie's Smile

    Death Valley, CaliforniaThis image is a medium format film original offered as a limited edition (50 impressions in all sizes) print on photo paper or watercolor paper.

  • Just My Word

    Just My Word

    Bodie, CaliforniaIn 1859 William (a.k.a. Waterman) S. Bodey discovered gold near what is now called Bodie Bluff. A mill was established in 1861 and the town began to grow. It started with about 20 miners and grew to an estimated 10,000 people by 1880! By then, the town of Bodie bustled with families, robbers, miners, store owners, gunfighters, prostitutes and people from every country in the world. At one time there was reported to be 65 saloons in town. Among the saloons were numerous brothels and 'houses of ill repute', gambling halls and opium dens - an entertainment outlet for everyone.This image is a medium format film original offered as a limited edition (50 impressions in all sizes) print on photo paper or watercolor paper.

  • End of the Line I

    End of the Line I

    Barstow, CaliforniaBarstow was founded as a railway town, and continues to be a major logistical center for material entering and leaving Los Angeles. The Burlington Northern Santa Fe rail company maintains one of its largest railway yards here, with 48 classification tracks, and the company's transcontinental route from Chicago forks at Barstow, with one track heading through the Cajon Pass to Los Angeles, and the other heading north to the San Francisco area. The old railway station in Barstow, located nearby, was a "Harvey House" restaurant, and it now houses the bus depot and a Route 66 museum.This image is a medium format film original offered as a limited edition (50 impressions in all sizes) print on canvas, photo paper or watercolor paper.

  • End of the Line II

    End of the Line II

    Barstow, CaliforniaBarstow was founded as a railway town, and continues to be a major logistical center for material entering and leaving Los Angeles. The Burlington Northern Santa Fe rail company maintains one of its largest railway yards here, with 48 classification tracks, and the company's transcontinental route from Chicago forks at Barstow, with one track heading through the Cajon Pass to Los Angeles, and the other heading north to the San Francisco area. The old railway station in Barstow, located nearby, was a "Harvey House" restaurant, and it now houses the bus depot and a Route 66 museum.This image is a medium format film original offered as a limited edition (50 impressions in all sizes) print on canvas, photo paper or watercolor paper.

How to Purchase Prints

Please call or email with the name of the desired image. All images are custom printed to your size specifications using premium materials. You may choose between a Premium 310gsm Watercolor Paper or a Premium Stretchable 20 mil Satin finish Canvas

p: (404) 406-9448

david@fineimaging.com